Student-Student Conflict

  • Sources of conflict
    • Student's attempt to increase popularity or power
    • Differing Socio-economic backgrounds
    • Sexualtiy
    • Gender
    • Race
    • Religion
    • Disabilities
    • Student's insecurities
    • Family-life
    • Rumors
    • Social Exclusions
    • Buses
    • Bus stops
    • Locker rooms   

                

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategies to resolve conflicts

  • Offer peer mediation to encourage students to solve their problems.
  • Set clear expectations for student conduct and conflict resolution
  • group meetings for students
  • Let students take the lead in resolving their conflicts, the teacher should not "tell" them how to resolve the conflict.
  • hold daily discussions on frienships and bullying, this is especially important with young children.
  • create a safe environment for students to dicuss their conflicts.
  • open door policy with school counselors.
  • allow students to share their experiences school- wide (ex: papers, newspapers, videos, announcements, etc.)
  •  incorporate literature about conflict resolution into the curriculum.
  • Invite organizations to come to school and hold "challenge days" (see resources)

 

 "...allowing students to take this leadership role created new relationships among students and affected students where it matters most -- in the heart"

-Sean M. Brooks, roundtable resource.

Resources

  • Round_Table_Discussions a program that allows students to face conflict head on and develop strategies to strengthen conflict resolution school-wide.
  • Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult; a young adult novel about school shootings and bullying.
  • children's books that promote conflict resolution:

    •  All in a Day by Mitsumasa Anno

    •  When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really Angry by Molly Bang

    • Gandhi by Demi

    • The Big Book for Peace edited by Ann Durell and Marilyn Sachs

    • Feathers and Fools by Mem Fox, illustrated by Nicholas Wilton

    • Seven Brave Women by Betsy Hearne, illustrated by Bethanne Andersen

    • Hey Little Ant by Philip & Hannah Hoose, illustrated by Debbie Tilley

    • Swimmy, The Alphabet Tree, and It’s Mine by Leo Lionni

    • The Peace Book by Todd Parr

    • The Winner by Kjell Ringi

    • Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport, illustrated by Brian Collier

    • Peace Begins with You by Katherine Scholes, illus. by Robert Ingpen

    • The Butter Battle Book by Dr. Seuss

    • Rotten Island by William Steig

    • The War Between the Vowels and the Consonants by Priscilla Turner,

    • illustrated by Whitney Turner 

    • Ferdinand, by Munro Leaf
  • Challenge_Day :
    • The Challenge Day mission is to provide youth and their communities with experiential programs that demonstrate the possibility of love and connection through the celebration of diversity, truth, and full expression.
  •  Anti_Bullying_Organizations students and teachers can join.
  • The_Courage_Retreat 
    • Identify personal fears and understand that everyone has them
    • Commit to acting with courage to make your school a better place
    • Deepen relationships with classmates to break down social barriers

 

 

 

NoBullying. "Common Causes of Bullying." No Bullying. N.p., 18 Sept. 2014. Web.

Smith, Peter K. "DEFINITION, TYPES AND PREVALENCE OF SCHOOL BULLYING AND VIOLENCE." DEFINITION, TYPES AND PREVALENCE OF SCHOOL BULLYING AND VIOLENCE Lecture Notes (n.d.): n. pag.Goldsmith College London University. Web

Brooks, Sean M. "Student Voices Against Bullying." AMLE. AMLE Magazine, Apr. 2014. Web. http://www.amle.org/BrowsebyTopic/WhatsNew/WNDet/TabId/270/ArtMID/888/ArticleID/401/Student-Voices-Against-Bullying.aspx.

Lambert, Megan. "Them Are Anti-Fighting Words (and Pictures): Conflicts and Conflict Resolution in Picture Books." (n.d.): n. pag. Carle Museum. Web.