History of Reading:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
History of Reading:
 

At first we learn to read. Then we read to learn. Reading is the root to all learning. Children who are good readers get a good start in school. Those who are confident about reading have a positive attitude toward learning.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Why is reading important?
  • Reading exercises our brain.
  • Reading improves concentration.
  • Reading opens up the world for children. It teaches children about the world around them. They learn about different cultures, societies and history. They learn about people, places and events outside their own experience. They are exposed to different things about the world that may be different from those that surround them.
  • Reading develops important language skills and improve the students ability to write well.
  • It also improves a child’s vocabulary
  • Children learn new words as they read but also learn how to structure sentences and how to use words and language effectively.

 

   

Student Reading Achievement Facts:
  • In 2008, California reported that only one-third of students who graduated from California public schools were prepared to go to a 4-year college ( The Center for Future of Teaching and Learning) 
  • Two thirds of eighth graders do not read at the "proficient" level. (NAEP Reading 2009) 
  • Only one-third of all students entering high school are proficient in reading -- only about 15 percent of African American students, and 17 percent of Hispanic students. (NAEP Reading 2009) 
  • In a 2005 study, 70% of 300 surveyed college instructors felt that students were unprepared to understand college level reading and comprehending complex materials. (Achieve, Inc)
 
 
 
 
 
 
What A Difference Reading Makes:
  • Students who read often are high achievers than those students who do not read often.
  • Students who like to read every day perform better on reading tests than those who don’t like to read. They also develop a broader vocabulary, a sense of others cultures and an increase in general knowledge.
  • Students learn an average of 4,000 to 12,000 new words each year as a result of reading children’s books.
  • Students whose parents read to them in their early school years is obvious to those who don’t read to their children.
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